Soundcraft Vi7000 Package Used, Second hand

1pc Vi7000 digital mixing console in flight case
1pc VI5000/7000 Local Rack in fligth case with 1x Dante and 2x Madi cards
1pc VI Stage Rack 64 in / 32 Out in flight case.

Photos on request.

More details

1.06.511
Used

26,990.00 €

26,990.00 € per Set

INQUIRE ABOUT THIS

 
About this product

Vi7000

The Vi7000 digital mixing consoles delivers the best Vi sound ever, bringing optional 96kHz processing, upgraded channel counts and even more reliable hardware to live sound's most popular mix interface. 
Partnering a compact control surface with new Local Rack and Active Breakout box hardware, Vi delivers simultaneous mixing of up to 128 inputs and 32 mono/stereo busses. 
Pristine sound quality is assured by ultra-low noise mic amp designs and enhanced 96kHz* 40-bit floating point digital audio processing, while FX come courtesy of 8 independent Lexicon multi-FX units, BSS DPR901ii integration and a BSS graphic EQ on every bus output. Rapid configuration and powerful automation features, radio mic status monitoring and extensive ViSi Connect I/O expansion (EtherSound, CobraNet, Dante, MADI, etc.) complete the package. 
Additional DSP cards and reduced channel count required for 96kHz operation 

Key New Features:
  • The latest Vistonics & FaderGlow interface
  • Up to 128 inputs and 32 mono/stereo busses
  • Enhanced audio processing with 96kHz sample rate option
  • Powerful new features including BSS DPR901ii Dynamic EQ
  • STUDER vMIX automatic microphone mixing built-in
  • New Local Rack hardware for 384 I/O channels
  • 128 channel record interface via MADI or Dante
  • Mix live with UA plug-ins (via Realtime Rack)
  • Huge connectivity options - Dante, Rocknet, Ethersound, Cobranet, MADI and more
Features
Live sound mixing - the way it should be

Our patented Vistonics was designed from a simple start point - create the most intuitive digital mix interface available. Rather than arranging controls around or adjacent to a flat TFT screen, a system that requires constant hand and eye co-ordination and mental mapping, Vistonics simplifies the process and puts the rotary encoders and switches right on the touch screen. 
With graphics behind the controls that change depending on the function, the operator is left in no doubt as to what parameter is being adjusted. 
With the display and relevant controls combined in one area, the operator is immediately presented with a simple, clear mix system that streamlines workflow and enhances the creative process. 
Each Vistonics interface controls eight input channels and comprises a touch screen with 16 rotary encoders and 16 switches. A simple touch in the desired part of the on-screen channel strip is all it takes to access channel functions including routing, input gain, digital gain trim, delay, high and low pass filters, 4-band fully parametric EQ, compressor, limiter, gate, de-esser and pan, with immediate access to a sophisticated visual status display and straightforward controls. 
In addition, a dedicated Vistonics II interface is provided for output processing control, and also functions as a complete meter overview display for all 128 inputs and 32 busses, as a snapshot cue list display, and as a display for diagnostics information.

Enhanced monitor mix features...

Vi consoles are equally designed for FOH and monitor mixing, with powerful features that makes it easy to mix large scale monitoring applications or deal with the compromises necessitated by mixing FOH and monitors from one surface. 

All busses to stereo

All busses can be turned to stereo without tying up two busses, providing a massive 32 stereo mix capability – perfect for mixing large monitor applications. 

4 Aux send points

With a total of 4 aux send pick-off points from the input channel for each send, monitor mix engineers have the flexibility to tailor mixes more closely to performers’ requirements. Sends can be pre-EQ, pre-compressor, pre-fade or post-fade on a per channel/per bus basis. 

Aux VCA mode

VCA master faders can control the aux sends of their member channels on a per mix basis, with FaderGlow illuminating in white to indicate the VCA’s operation on the current mix. Monitor engineers can retain control of important global elements such as ambient mics while also having a monitor mix selected and adjusting groups of sources within the current mix using the Aux-VCAs. Blue illumination of FaderGlow indicates that the VCA is controlling the global channel level to all mixes. 

Auto-increase of ambient mic levels in monitor mixes between songs

Performers using in-ear monitors want to hear the audience between songs? No problem. Vi consoles have the facility to externally control the Gate or Ducking processing from a bus in the console, so all you have to do is insert a ducker on an ambient mic with an external source of the LR bus or a spare bus, and the audience level increases automatically when the performers stop playing.

...and radio mic status monitoring

You know what it’s like. The radio mics check out fine on the RF Tech’s laptop, but that’s before the talent walks onto the stage. Reception black spots, drained batteries, accidental mutes – anything can happen once the show gets underway. 
Vi makes the engineer’s life easier, letting you monitor the status of any compatible AKG or Shure radio mic directly from the Soundcraft Vi Series console surface, courtesy of VM2 (Vistonics Microphone Monitoring). With realtime visual displays of battery life, RF status, mic muting and internal clipping, you’ll be able to see a problem long before you hear it, right there on the relevant channel strip – with expanded information instantly available just by touching the Vistonics screen. 
And system configuration couldn’t be more straightforward – simply plug in the mics, associate them to the related console channels, and you’re done. You can even identify the relevant mic receiver in the rack by pressing the Locate button, causing the receiver front panel display to flash. 
It all adds up to much more efficient workflow and one less thing for the engineer to worry about.

Automixing for Corporate Events

Vi5000 & 7000 now feature built-in STUDER vMIX processing, allowing seamless automixing of up to 4 separate groups of 16 microphone channels. vMIX allows the levels of multiple microphones to be managed to automatically to reduce the gain of any person who is not speaking, whilst keeping overall gain constant and reacting faster than a human hand to the sudden level changes in a dynamic panel discussion.

World-class effects and dynamics inside

Minimising the need for outboard processing gear, Vi5000 and Vi7000 put class-leading effects and dynamics from Lexicon and BSS directly within the console. Via the Vistonics interface and FaderGlow surface, Vi provides the perfect vehicle for effects control. No wonder many engineers are claiming that Vi is the only console they would use without any additional processing equipment. 

BSS DPR901ii and Graphic EQ

The BSS DPR901ii was an industry-standard analogue dynamic equaliser used the world over for its capability as a powerful tool for awkward corrective tasks. A unique feature of the DPR901ii was the under/over threshold switch on each band, enabling the equaliser to react in either cut or boost mode to correct problems that occur only on loud or only on quiet signals. The Vi5000 and Vi7000 bring the world’s first accurately modelled version of the original analogue unit, to the digital domain. 16 instances of this classic processor are available via the console’s insert pool to use as required. 
In addition to the BSS DPR901ii, there’s also a BSS third-octave Graphic Equaliser on every bus output. The Equaliser is modelled on the BSS960 analogue unit and includes a global Q adjustment allowing narrow bandwidth for stage monitor applications, or wider Q for system tuning on the main outputs. 

Lexicon Effects

Vi puts powerful Lexicon effects at the hands of the operator via the Vi Series Processor Card. 
The card empowers the console with 8 independent stereo Lexicon multi-effects units - each providing 14 reverbs, 7 delays and 8 pitch shifting effects, patchable to input channels, aux outputs and channel inserts.

Mix live with UA plug-ins

Answering the call for high-fidelity ‘off-the-record’ studio processing at live events, Soundcraft Realtime Rack unlocks a world of creative possiblilities by placing Universal Audio’s acclaimed analogue audio processing emulations and award- winning UAD Plug-Ins seamlessly within your mix environment. 
Realtime Rack software gives Vi console operators all the control they need to insert UAD Plug-Ins on individual channels, auxiliary channels, and master busses – just as easily as real hardware. Control of the plug- ins is via an intuitive and responsive external touchscreen interface. A comprehensive snapshot system allows total recall of all plug-ins and their settings, while tight network integration with the Vi Series ensures that all settings of the application are stored inside the console. Two versions are available:

  • The Realtime Rack Ultimate Live with 74 plug-ins, and the Realtime Rack Core Live with 14 plug-ins. Additional UAD Plug-Ins can be purchased any time from UA’s Online store. 
  • The UAD Powered Plug-Ins platform offers the world’s most authentic analogue hardware emulations and award-winning audio plug-ins. Powered by Universal Audio’s DSP Accelerator hardware, UAD Powered Plug-Ins deliver rich, analogue sound quality that would be difficult or impossible to achieve with native plug-in host systems. From rare compressors and equalizers, to vintage reverb processors and tape machines, UAD Powered Plug-Ins inject three-dimensional ‘out-of-the- box’ analogue sound to your mixes. 

The factory-designed flightcases for the Vi5000 and Vi7000 control surfaces include rack space and fittings to allow integration of up to three Realtime Racks, a Mac Mini computer for control and provision for storage and mounting of an external touchscreen monitor. 

Used Soundcraft

Soundcraft is dedicated to designing quality Mixing Consoles for everyone whether an experienced professional sound engineer or an up and coming learner.Design and innovation has always been at the heart of Soundcraft's philosophy. Over the years it has introduced a number of iconic consoles such as the Broadway, Sapphyre.
GB Series, MH series, Vi Series, Si Series, Signature and Ui. and being twinned with sister console company Studer, has been responsible for industry changing innovations such as the patented FaderGlow and Vistonics user interfaces all designed to make the engineers job and learning easier.

Active: Powered. An active crossover is electrically powered and divides the line-level signal prior to amplification. An active speaker includes an active crossover and built-in amplifier. Amplifier: A component that increases the gain or level of an audio signal.Balanced Input: A connection with three conductors: two identical signal conductors that are 180 degrees out of phase with each other, and one ground. This type of connection is very resistant to line noise. Bandpass: A two-part filter that cuts both higher and lower frequencies around a center band. A bandpass enclosure cuts high frequencies by acoustic cancellation and low frequencies by natural physical limitations on bass response. Bandwidth: In audio, the range of frequencies a device operates within. In video, the range of frequencies passed from the input to the output. Bandwidth can also refer to the transmission capacity of an electronic communications device or system; the speed of data transfer…very important when planning a meeting for the attendees to stay connected. Bass: Low frequencies; those below approximately 200 Hz. CD: Compact Disc. Ubiquitous digital audio format. Uses 16-bit/44.1-kHz sampling rate PCM digital signal to encode roughly 74 or 80 minutes of two- channel, full-range audio onto a 5-inch disc. Channel: In components and systems, a channel is a separate signal path. A four-channel amplifier has at least four separate inputs and four separate outputs.Crossover: A component that divides an audio signal into two or more ranges by frequency, sending, for example, low frequencies to one output and high frequencies to another. An active crossover is powered and divides the line-level audio signal prior to amplification. A passive crossover uses no external power supply and may be used either at line level or, more commonly, at speaker level to divide the signal after amplification and send the low frequencies to the woofer and the high frequencies to the tweeter. Crossover Frequency: The frequency at which an audio signal is divided. 80 Hz is a typical subwoofer crossover point and is the recommended crossover point in theatrical and home THX systems. Frequencies below 80 Hz are sent to the subwoofer; signals above 80 Hz are sent to the main speakers.Decibel (dB): A logarithmic measurement unit that describes a sound's relative loudness, though it can also be used to describe the relative difference between two power levels. A decibel is one tenth of a Bel. In sound, decibels generally measure a scale from 0 (the threshold of hearing) to 120-140 dB (the threshold of pain). A 3dB difference equates to a doubling of power. A 10dB difference is required to double the subjective volume. A 1dB difference over a broad frequency range is noticeable to most people, while a 0.2dB difference can affect the subjective impression of a sound.Delay: The time difference between a sonic event and its perception at the listening position (sound traveling through space is delayed according to the distance it travels). People perceive spaciousness by the delay between the arrival of direct and reflected sound (larger spaces cause longer delays).Diaphragm: The part of a dynamic loudspeaker attached to the voice coil that produces sound. It usually has the shape of a cone or dome.Diffusion: In audio, the scattering of sound waves, reducing the sense of localization. In video, the scattering of light waves, reducing hot spotting, as in a diffusion screen.Digital Audio Server: Essentially a hard drive, a digital audio server stores compressed audio files (like MP3 or WMA). Most include the processing to make the files, and all have the ability to play them back.Dispersion: The spread of sound over a wide area.Distortion: Any undesired change in an audio signal between input and the output.Dolby B: A noise-reduction system that increases the level of high frequencies during recording and decreases them during playback.Dolby C: An improvement on Dolby B that provides about twice as much noise reduction.Dolby Digital: An encoding system that digitally compresses up to 5.1 discrete channels of audio (left front, center, right front, left surround, right surround, and LFE) into a single bitstream, which can be recorded onto a DVD, HDTV broadcast, or other form of digital media. When RF-modulated, it was included on some laser discs, which requires an RF-demodulator before the signal can be decoded. Five channels are full-range; the .1 channel is a band-limited LFE track. A Dolby Digital processor (found in most new receivers, preamps, and some DVD players) can decode this signal back into the 5.1 separate channels. Most films since 1992's Batman Returns have been recorded in a 5.1 digital format, though a number of films before that had 6-channel analog tracks that have been remastered into 5.1.Dolby EX: An enhancement to Dolby Digital that adds a surround back channel to 5.1 soundtracks. The sixth channel is matrixed from the left and right surround channels. Often referred to as 6.1. Sometimes referred to as 7.1 if the system uses two surround back speakers, even though both speakers reproduce the same signal. Software is backwards-compatible with 5.1 systems, but requires an EX or 6.1 processor to obtain additional benefit.Dolby Pro Logic: An enhancement of the Dolby Surround decoding process. Pro Logic decoders derive left, center, right, and a mono surround channel from two-channel Dolby Surround encoded material via matrix techniques. Dolby Pro Logic II: An enhanced version of Pro Logic. Adds improved decoding for two-channel, non-encoded soundtracks and music. Driver: A speaker without an enclosure; also refers to the active element of a speaker system that creates compressions and rarefactions in the air.DSP: Digital Signal Processing. Manipulating an audio signal digitally to create various possible effects at the output. Often refers to artificially generated surround effects derived from and applied to two-channel sources.DTS: Digital Theater Systems. A digital sound recording format, originally developed for theatrical film soundtracks, starting with Jurassic Park. Records 5.1 discrete channels of audio onto a handful of laser discs, CDs, and DVDs. Requires a player with DTS output connected to a DTS processor.DTS ES: An enhanced version of the 5.1 DTS system. Like Dolby's Surround EX, a sixth channel is added. In some cases (DTS ES Discrete), the sixth channel is discrete. Software is backwards-compatible with 5.1 systems, but requires an ES or 6.1 processor to obtain additional benefit. Neo: 6 is a subset of DTS ES that creates 6.1 from material with fewer original channels.Dynamic Range: The difference between the lowest and the highest levels; in audio, it's often expressed in decibels. In video, it's listed as the contrast ratio.Equalizer: A component designed to alter the frequency balance of an audio signal. Equalizers may be graphic, parametric, or a combination of both. Fade: A gradual increase in audio, i.e. a fade-up, or a gradual decrease in audio, i.e. a fade-down.Feedback: The transmission of current or voltage from the output of a device back to the input, where it interacts with the input signal to modify operation of the device. Feedback is positive when it's in phase with the input and negative when it's out of phase. Frequency: The number of cycles (vibrations) per second. In audio, audible frequencies commonly range from 20 to 20,000 cycles per second (Hz). In video, frequency is used to define the image resolution. Low-frequency video images depict large objects or images. Higher frequencies depict smaller objects (finer details). Frequency Response: A measure of what frequencies can be reproduced and how accurately they are reproduced. A measurement of 20 to 20,000 Hz, 3dB means those frequencies between 20 and 20,000 Hz can be reproduced no more than 3 dB above or below a reference frequency level. Full-Range: A speaker designed to reproduce the full range (20 Hz to 20 kHz) of audio frequencies.Gain: Increase in level or amplitude.Gooseneck: This refers to amicrophone with a flexible neck that is most frequently attached to a podium or lectern. It is designed to allow the speaker to raise or lower the microphone to a suitable height.Graphic Equalizer: A type of equalizer with sliding controls that creates a pattern representing a graph of the frequency-response changes. Raising sliders boosts the affected frequencies; lowering sliders cuts (attenuates) the affected frequencies.High Pass: A filter that passes high frequencies, and attenuates low frequencies. Same as low cut.Hz: Hertz or cycles per second. Something that repeats a cycle once each second moves at a rate of 1 Hz.Incue/Inq/In-Point: These words all refer to the initial few seconds of audio signifying the beginning of the production.Impedance: A measure of the impediment to the flow of alternating current, measured in ohms at a given frequency. Larger numbers mean higher resistance to current flow.KHz: Kilohertz or one thousand Hz.Lavaliere: A small microphone that attaches to clothing, allowing the speaker to have a hands-free presentation.Line Array: A group of speakers that have been arrayed or “built up” in the vertical or horizontal plane, which allow for a highly consistent sound field. A Line Array is perfect for medium to large audiences.Midbass: The middle of the bass part of the frequency range, from approximately 50 to 100 Hz (upper bass would be from 100 to 200 Hz). Also used as a term for loudspeaker drivers designed to reproduce both bass and midrange frequencies. Midrange: The middle of the audio frequency range. Also used as a term for loudspeaker drivers designed to reproduce this range. Mixer: This is the unit in which audio signals are directed from. A mixer provides for both mic and line input combinations while allowing you to control one or more outputs.MP3: MPEG-1 Audio Layer-3. Compression scheme used to transfer audio files via the Internet and store in portable players and digital audio servers. Natural Sound (NATS): The nonverbal audio that occurs in a non-studio setting. NATS can be used to help characterize the setting.Noise: An unwanted portion of a signal such as hiss, hum, whine, static, or buzzing.Passive: Not active. A passive crossover uses no external power and results in insertion loss. A passive speaker is one without internal amplification.Phase: Time relationship between signals; it's all relative.Power Output: A measure, usually in watts, of how much energy is modulated by a component.Preamplifier: A control and switching component that may include equalization functions. The preamp comes in the signal chain before the amplifiers.surround processor portion of the receiver and the input of the amplifier portion of the receiver.Processors: Anything that processes an incoming signal in some way. Surround processors, for example, can decode a Dolby Digital signal to send to an amp so you can hear it.Pulse Code Modulation: (PCM) a way to convert sound or analog information to binary information (0s and 1s) by taking samples of the sound and record the resulting number as binary information. Used on all CDs, DVD-Audio, and just about every other digital audio format. It can sometimes be found on DVD-Video.RF: Radio Frequency. Television signals are modulated onto RF signals and are then demodulated by your television's tuner. VCRs and DBS receivers often include channel 3 or 4 modulators, allowing the output signal to be tuned by the television on those channels. Also, laser discs used an RF signal for modulating Dolby Digital 5.1 soundtracks on some movies. This requires an RF demodulator (usually referred to as an AC3-RF demodulator) before or in the surround processor to decode the signal. RMS: Root Mean Square or the square root of the arithmetic mean (average) of the square's set of values. A reasonably accurate method of describing an amplifier's power output. Signal-to-Noise Ratio: A comparison of the signal level relative to the noise level. Larger numbers are better. Simultaneous Interpretation: This system allows attendees to hear the meeting in their own language. Sound field: The total acoustical characteristics of a space, such as ambience; number, timing, and relative level of reflections; ratio of direct to reflected sound; RT-60 time; etc. Speaker: A component that converts electrical energy into acoustical energy. SPL: Sound-Pressure Level. Measured in dB. Subwoofer: A speaker designed to reproduce very low bass frequencies, usually those below about 80 Hz.THX: Certification program for home theater equipment. Uses some proprietary features, but mostly assures a base quality level for a given room size. (See THX Select or Ultra.) Is compatible with any and all soundtrack formats. Stands for either Tom Holman's eXperiment, after the engineer who drafted the original standard, or is named after the company's founder George Lucas' first movie, THX 1138. Nobody agrees on which.

30 other products in the same category: